Mastery is only achieved when technique is transcended and the art becomes an ‘artless art’ growing out of the unconscious.

When he reached the height of perfection, bow, arrow, goal and archer all melted into one another and he did not shoot, but ‘it’ did it for him.
Mastery is only achieved when technique is transcended and the art becomes an ‘artless art’ growing out of the unconscious.
Herrigel’s description of archery is one of the purest accounts of Zen, because it does not talk about Zen at all.
Sitting quietly, doing nothing,
Spring comes, and the grass grows by itself.
- Zen Poem
The actual realization of one’s Buddha nature; body and mind being fused into a harmonious unity which needs no further improvement.
Before you study Zen, mountains are mountains and rivers are rivers; while you are studying Zen, mountains are no longer mountains and rivers are no longer rivers but once you have had enlightenment, mountains are once again mountains and rivers again rivers.
The perfection of Zen is thus to live one’s everyday life naturally and spontaneously. When Po-chang was asked to define Zen, he said, When hungry eat, when tired sleep.’ Although this sounds simple and obvious, like so much in Zen, it is in fact quite a difficult task. To regain the naturalness of our original nature requires long training and constitutes a great spiritual achievement. In the words of a famous Zen saying
It’s much like riding an ox in search of the ox.